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PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2017 3:50 pm 
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Location: Lancashire
A team, supported by Nasa, using a sophisticated computer model, claims to have come up with an accurate account of the climatic effects of the 10km-wide asteroid that crashed into the Gulf of Mexico some 65 million years ago.
The asteroid caused the fifth mass extinction in Earth-history, triggering earthquakes, tsunamis and volcanoes. The smoke and dust that enveloped the planet, persisted for two years, after which chemical reactions in the upper atmosphere removed much of the protective ozone layer, so that the Sun's energy would have irradiated everything on the surface.
The research team said that their research could assist in working out the atmospheric effects of large nuclear weapons explosions, with the possibility of a nuclear winter.
Dr. Charles Bardeen at the US Center for Atmospheric Research, a member of the team, said that the initial asteroid impact would only have been the beginning of Earth's troubles. "The extinction of many of the large animals on land could have been caused by the immediate aftermath of the impact, but animals that lived in the oceans or those that could burrow underground, or slip underwater temporarily could have survived," he said. "Our study picks up after the initial effects - after the earthquakes, tsunamis and broiling."
This doesn't account for why the birds survived. There were birds in the Jurassic, so they survived two mass extinctions. It could have something to do with birds' efficient respiratory systems, but, presumably, so had terrasaurs and they disappeared.
Maybe an educated parrot could tell us the secret of their survivalist success :wink: .

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Last edited by brian livesey on Thu Aug 31, 2017 4:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 3:33 pm 
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If it's not a polygon. :)

Well it is raining and cold, so not much astronomy.

Regards,
David


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 30, 2017 6:38 pm 
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Location: Portslade, Sussex Lat 50deg 51min Long 0deg 13mins West
Wettish, cold, grey Wednesday here too but just as the Sun heads for Southwick Hill, the clouds have broken a bit and the sky has gone yellow, with a tiny bit of blue low down! regards maf


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:43 am 
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Further data from Japan suggests that the sheer destructiveness of the asteroid/comet was due to the object penetrating ground rich in hydrocarbons.
If the land had been devoid of hydrocarbons, the effects would have been considerably less. The debate will probably continue for some time to come... .

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